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The 13 Best Horror Movies on Netflix Right Now

(Source: mentalfloss.com)

The psychology behind our love of horror films is pretty simple: We love the adrenaline rush, and we feel comparatively safe knowing that a hatchet-wielding clown isn’t lurking outside our window. (Probably. Feel free to go investigate.)

If you’re ever in the mood for those particular thrills without leaving the comfort of your couch, there’s an easy solution. Kill the lights and check out any one of the best scary movies on Netflix right now.

Stephen King‘s 1983 novel immediately came roaring to life in this tale of a high school square who restores a 1958 Plymouth Fury to its original glory. It’s a classic, but unfortunately, it’s also evil and out of warranty. While it’s no The Shining, John Carpenter’s no-frills adaptation is one of the better entries in the King film canon of the 1980s.

This tale of a 1630s outcast Puritan family troubled by paranormal activity tends to be divisive. You’ll either enjoy the methodically slow burn, or you won’t. Give in to the movie’s deliberate pacing and you’ll likely find that it excels in delivering an unbearable sense of dread. And you’ll never look at goats the same way again.

The pinnacle of M. Night Shyamalan’s career is also one of the last times Bruce Willis seemed interested in carrying a movie. As a child psychologist treating a boy (Haley Joel Osment) who claims to see ghosts, Willis offers a compellingly subdued performance. If you haven’t seen The Sixth Sense in a while, watching it with the knowledge of the Rod Serling-esque third-act twist is to appreciate Shyamalan’s sleight-of-hand.

Patrick Stewart sheds his proper image to portray a man prone to excessive profanity and ethnic biases in this gritty horror-thriller. When a punk band plays a gig in the middle of nowhere, they’re dismayed to discover that all roads lead to a murdering, marauding group of neo-Nazis led by Stewart.

A workaholic father and his daughter board a train bound for one of the few territories in South Korea not occupied by zombies. To get there, they’ll have to survive the infected passengers, who totally ignore their seat assignments and sanctioned dinner options.

Home invasion thrillers might be clogging up the streaming queues, but few do it better than The Strangers, a potently cruel and concentrated dose of domestic horror. Liv Tyler and Scott Speedman star as a couple terrorized by a trio of killers who seem to have that most frightening of motivations: None at all.

Don’t look for costumed maniacs in writer/director David Robert Mitchell’s low-budget cult hit. The terror is an unseen entity that trails teenagers like a post-coital disease. The STI metaphor might seem a little on the nose, but the creeping dread is unsettling to the core.

A high-concept (serial killer stages his crime scenes with a Seven Deadly Sins theme) thriller, Se7en could have wallowed in the bargain bins of Blockbusters if not for the talent attracted to Andrew Kevin Walker’s script. Brad Pitt and Morgan Freeman are ostensibly the leads, but it’s David Fincher’s vision of a bleak, rain-soaked metropolis that elevates this from the downpour of clever-murderer movies in the 1990s. If you’ve somehow avoided details of the climax, know that this is not a movie that plays nice with its audience. Or with Pitt.

While the real-life exploits of paranormal ghost hunters the Warrens (Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga) may be in some question, there’s no doubting this retelling of one of their famous haunted house cases is a chilling roller coaster ride.

A couple celebrates their wedding anniversary by inviting a babysitter named Anna to look after their three kids while they go out to dinner. Unfortunately for all parties involved, Anna isn’t really Anna, and her motivations go far beyond picking up a few dollars. Emelie commits to one of the largest taboos in the horror genre: It’s not afraid to pick on little kids.

A romantic weekend retreat with her husband turns into a claustrophobic struggle for survival for Carla Gugino after he drops dead and she’s left handcuffed to their bed. This adaptation of Stephen King‘s novel is one of the rare films to do right by the author, preserving his psychological (and visceral) scares.

Fans of the slow burn should enjoy this potboiler about a man (Logan Marshall-Green) invited to his ex’s dinner party, which takes a turn for the weird. The last scene is a killer.

A documentary about sleep disorders doesn’t sound all that unsettling, particularly when Freddy Krueger has the market cornered on the horrors of insomnia. But this examination of sleep paralysis (where sufferers are awake but can’t move their bodies) chills thanks to dramatizations of the people, creatures, and things they sometimes see when immobilized.

Reminder: Netflix rotates their library of titles often, so our selection of the best scary movies on Netflix is subject to change.

More Info: mentalfloss.com

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