Technology

Take a moment to admire this origami Ethernet jack

(Source: www.theverge.com)

Check out the crazy origami Ethernet port on this new Fujitsu laptop (yeah they’re back making laptops now) pic.twitter.com/U51iahNelr

Just look at that would you. Take a moment to admire the mechanical overkill of the pull-out Ethernet jack on this “new” Fujitsu laptop. It doesn’t matter which Fujitsu laptop because the computer’s not important, and Fujitsu has been doing this for years. What matters is that we pay our final respects to this marvel of excessive engineering before it disappears completely under a tsunami of Wi-Fis, or, you know, breaks.

The Ethernet jack went semi-viral recently after Twitter user decryption tweeted out photos of the “crazy origami port.” The internet was quick to point out similar feats of engineering around the RJ45 plug.

Dell’s approach, for example, is much more… Dell:

the new Dell Latitudes have a little flap… pic.twitter.com/yEDkLn45TC

— Ollie (@Tw1sty) December 7, 2017

The Fujitsu jack is impressive, sure, but anyone who’s old enough to remember PCMCIA expansion cards (later shortened to just PC Cards) can only shrug, as Lars Karlslund was quick to point out:

But here’s the original 🙂 pic.twitter.com/hAYuLtI8q0

— Lars Karlslund (@lkarlslund) December 7, 2017

But as cool as these Ethernet cards were, they resulted in something like this in everyday usage:

This is nuts! Going to get broken soooo easily. 3com’s XJACK system was similar, but required you to insert the cable in a vertical orientation, placing even more strain on the connector. pic.twitter.com/ddgnNq4oSV

— Daniel Marsh (@Infoseepage) December 7, 2017

A scenario any owner of a wireless mouse from Apple can commiserate with:

But I digress.

In this age of perfectly hewn rectangular slabs, where the most impressive new computers — our phones — are nearly void of mechanical parts, let us pay homage to the few tactile joys that remain. Because soon the full-sized Ethernet jack will be just a memory, like the butterfly keyboards, spinning hard disks, and headphones jacks of yore.

More Info: www.theverge.com

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