(Source: www.straitstimes.com)

Singaporean Khim Ng, 25, became the fifth contender from Singapore to join a team on Sing! China,a popular Chinese singing reality show, in Friday night’s (Aug 11) episode.

She was selected by Hong Kong singer Eason Chan, one of the show’s four mentor-cum-judges. But she has already posted on social media that she will be eliminated because Chan had exceeded his quota of nine singers in his team.

She told The Straits Times: “I felt all right and calm. Making it to the blind auditions is a big bonus for me. Getting the seal of approval from the judges is already a very big deal. I am really humbled and happy by the experience.”

After Sing! China’s producers scouted her to join the show, she flew to China four times for several auditions, starting from February.

“Actually it is a very long process before we make it to the blind auditions. Some people make it to Hangzhou, but they don’t get to audition. The producers don’t tell you much, you can only wait and guess,” said Ng, a full-time musician who has regular singing gigs at The Mad Men Attic Bar and Shanghai Dolly.

When she finally made it to the blind audition stage, the female rocker was hot property. Judges Na Ying and Chan wanted to recruit her after listening to her performance of Canadian singer Alanis Morissette’s You Oughta Know.

She chose Chan, a Cantopop star, because he looked like “fun to work with” and is known to be able to deliver a wide range of genres.

Alas, she got kicked out after competing in another round.

Ng, who had competed in Campus Superstar in 2006, is rooting for the Singapore talents still in the contest – Joanna Dong, Olinda Cho, Curley Gao and Stella Seah.

She said: “I’m very proud of them. It is good to know that there so many of us made it, especially since they are all girls. Everyone has worked very hard. They all deserve to be on this amazing platform. I really hope they would go as far as possible.”

Sing! China airs on Jia Le Channel (Singtel TV Channel 502) on Fridays at 9pm, the same time as in China.

More Info: www.straitstimes.com

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